What is the deal with this guy ?

Just take a look at that picture. I challenge you to look at that picture and not smile.

The expression on that woman’s face is wonderful.  There is an unrestrained joy in that face.  That face is real and genuine and if just happy.

Happy because she is listening to words that resonate with her and ideas which she can support.  Happy because she feels that finally someone is speaking to her personally and saying I see the same things you do.  I get angry about the same things you do. I can do something about it.

There is so much more tied up in Jeremy Corbyn than politics.  The people who are passionate about him are so because he is a focal point which has inspired action and will inspire more.  The bias  media coverage of this man has been seen and recorded in three separate reports, highlighting that the news itself has an agenda and it is not one which is in favour of socialism.

What also makes people smile like this when they see or hear Jeremy Corbyn is that you actually know that what he says he means and he will work his hardest to get it.  He has principle and morals and he stands by these and that is something unique not normally seen in politics.  And that is why the woman is smiling .

She knows that finally to one politician at least she is not collateral , as Theresa May or Owen Smith may see the public  as both of them are so keen to push the button on trident.  She is not a person to be dismissed because of her sex. She is not just a vote to push someone into power.  She knows she to this man she is a living human being not a number,  and that is how he sees everyone around the world.

When was the last time you saw anyone create such a look on another persons face?

That is why we are fighting to keep him as leader of the Labour Party.

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62 comments on “What is the deal with this guy ?

  1. John says:

    Bernadette: the entire purpose of so-called “new” Labour was to ignore the needs of working class people and to pitch an appeal to middle-class voters – rather like the mothers you describe – who took over the Sure Start provision in your area for their own selfish class-based ends.
    It was a definite and deliberate Blairite strategy to gain power by taking working class votes for granted – as you yourself have outlined – and to develop policies designed largely to benefit and appeal to middle-class people.
    Davey: there was another significant development in the 1980s you made no mention of – the emergence of the SDP. They particularly undermined Labour for the best part of a decade.
    This may yet happen again if some of the malodorous 170 decide to go down a similar path.
    I would also add in retrospect that the Major Government was a busted flush by the time of the 1997 general election. Blair just happened to be in the fortunate position of Leader of the Labour Party at the time and the widespread revulsion against the Tories at the time played perfectly into his hands.
    For years we were told it was Blair’s “brilliance” and Mandelson’s “spin” that won us power.
    It was not true.
    It was the UK electorate who decided who won and lost, not Blair or Mandelson.
    It will also be the UK electorate who will decide to elect a Corbyn-led Labour Government – not the mass media.

    Like

  2. Bitethehand says:

    One of the consequences of experiencing an ecstatic conversion is that it tends to affect the memory rather selectively.

    Sarah writes:

    “That’s the thing, even Labour had stopped aiming at families like ours. The rhetoric across all parties became increasingly aimed at those lucky enough to dream of buying a house, not those who struggled to buy bread.”

    Here’s the Guardian in November 2010 about the Labour Party’s Sure Start programme:

    Disadvantaged children who were the first to use Labour’s flagship Sure Start scheme were less likely to be overweight by the time they were five, were in better health and had less chaotic home lives, according to an official evaluation released today.

    Mothers using the programme, which in its early stages was targeted at families in the most deprived areas, also reported providing a more stimulating home learning environment for their children, disciplining them less harshly and being more satisfied with life.

    Researchers from the National Evaluation of Sure Start, at Birkbeck College in London, have been following 7,000 families in 150 areas where the first Sure Start schemes were introduced in 1999. They monitored the children at nine months and three years old – this evaluation was the latest check-up on their progress.

    One of the reasons we got a Tory – Lib Dem government in 2010 and a Tory one in 2015 is because members of the Labour Party both inside and outside Parliament are so fixated, even obsessed with damning their own side and expressing their hatred of Tony Blair. And one of the biggest culprits inside Parliament of course is Jeremy Corbyn.

    https://therealuntrusted.wordpress.com/

    Like

    • John says:

      You bring some very interesting information to our attention – and then arrive at the wrong conclusion.
      We all know that not everything Blair and New Labour did was wrong.
      As a young father, my nephew found the Sure Start and other programmes extremely helpful.
      He has now joined the Labour Party after wasting years being a Lib Dem supporter.
      To conclude that Jeremy Corbyn opposed Sure Start or other programmes of assistance to families is not right.
      As far as I – and, I think, most of us now – are concerned, Blair is yesterday’s man.
      Little of what he thinks or says is of any interest or relevance any more.
      The overarching requirement today is to get JC elected and his new policies implemented.

      Like

    • Thank you for reply. As a childcare worker of many years experience i had young children at the time so many of the sure start schemes were available in my area.
      Sure start is a wonderful idea and concept but like many wonderful concepts the practise needs to be as good as the theory.

      In this area the sure start schemes were dominated by mothers who were not the target audience. They then became involved in setting up events targeted to a more affluent audience. For example a riverside stroll was organised which culminated in visiting a lovely riverside pub. (I’m not making that up) as well as music and creative events being filled with mothers who could easily afford to pay for these events but were informed enough and confident enough to actually take part.

      I am not saying excellent work was not done through sure start , when it reached its target group and when it was used by those in need. However a much better way of helping mothers and children would be to actually address childcare provision. Working with parents on a daily basis , helping them to teach their children , having a point of contact to deal with financial issues. All of this could be provided within a nursery setting .

      The legacy of the last labour government is however not recalled in the things they got right but the things they got wrong . War, union restrictions, failure to build social housing , failure to actually speak for those who needed a voice, thinking they had the right to give each other’s turns at being PM because of a deal between each other, failure to support the families of hillsborough or look into the events during the miners strike , distancing themselves from the core supporters, loosing Scotland , Wales and core supporters and creating the ethos amongst Labour MPs that it does not matter what the electorate want as long as they keep power and who have the audacity to state what they see as the electable and go through hell and high water in an attempt to stop anyone who does not hold this view from doing anything.

      They left thousands of Labour Supporters in limbo like myself voting labour just because it was labour not really because they agreed with what they stood for anymore but who could turn no where else.

      The Labour Party is a democratic socialist party. I was at a CLP meeting the other night and someone said that Owen Smith was too left wing for them. I really believe that this is indicative of those who in my opinion have let this country down through their dilution of the true values of the Labour Party. Having a labour lite has seen the rise in the UKIP support , leading to the referendum where the campaign was dominated by a power hungry Etonian lying through his back teeth whilst his school chum actually instigated the whole thing just to get elected. The rise of hate crime and the far right, the economic mess, the new PM all stemming from this debacle.

      However , it is much easier for those who have brought the Labour Party to this sorry state to blame one man. He of course had the full weight of the media to corrupt the minds of all those against the Labour Party whilst they we in power. He of course led all those rebellions and coups , plotting and scheming from the very first day Mr Blair was elected. He of course failed to tow the line and lie about his belief in the EU, but still headed a campaign which got 63% of his followers to vote remain. He is of course responsible for the Tory election fraud which is being investigated every so quietly. He of course is the one who bailed out the banks and poured billions into the financial system after brexit.

      And of course he has single handedly corrupted the minds of the public who have no confidence in politics and are seeing through the lies and want another way and another voice to shout for them so they don’t see how Owen Smith is a much better leader for the Labour Party .

      No. It just so happens that the British People can make up their own minds and there is a social paradigm shift in what we want from our elected representatives. This is not 1979 it is 2016. We have more information at our fingertips then ever before. We can communicate on mass and find out the lies and the smears. We can hear reports telling us how they lied to go to war. We can see the suffering of people not just here but around the world. We can fight the injustices and win. And these people want a change of politics a change from what we have been fed for the last 37 years.

      This is what the Labour Party are failing to see this is why we are vocal this is why we rally.

      So if Jeremy Corbyn was shouting against the Blair government then good on him. Because whatever good the Labour Party did Blair is responsible for the death of millions, instability throughout the world, spending of trillions in arms, the refugee crisis, the rise of the far right, the demonisation of a religion , the loss of privacy and human rights, the condoning of the use of torture.

      So unfortunately the fact his government gave us a few “nursery rhymes with mummy” sessions is really not an argument.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Davey Stewart says:

        WOW! Now that is why is believe you need to be on a podium Bernadette! You have just summarised the the truth of what supporting Jeremy Corbyn is, and should be, all about. It’s is quite remarkable that so many of the ‘Blarite’ New Labour supporters are either sheeple who believe EVERYTHING they are told by the lame stream media, or are those that really should be voting Tory because they somehow benefit from the sort of political points of view that you have so rightfully pointed out as being wrong.

        It is high time the Labour party resorted back to it’s socialist values that appeal to, and benefit, the wider masses of this nation. It is no longer acceptable for the party to operate as ‘Diet Tory’ or even ‘Full Fat Tory’ as was the case with New Labour.

        When Tony Blair was elected in 1997, it was largely due to the fact that he was a great orator, the alternative was John Major, and the Tories has caused so much heartache and destruction of the UK since 1979. The only reason Margaret Thatcher lasted as long as she did was because of the ‘Falklands effect’, which saw her waning approval figures skyrocket after the conflict ended. It created a huge wave of patriotism, which was cemented by the Charles and Diana royal wedding and eventual birth of Prince William. If it hadn’t have been for those events, we would have had Michael Foot’s socialist Labour party running the nation for the good of the masses rather than the few.

        Foolishly, many people believe that we must have some form of New Labour in order to get into number 10, Downing Street. That attitude is starting to change now that we share information and opinions like never before seen in history. Owen Jones seems to believe that social media is a very small part of the requirements needed to win a general election. I disagree! I believe that the power of the MSM is diminishing fast, especially after Leveson, Hillsborough and Chilcot etc, whilst more people are communicating using Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and even becoming the authors of their own blogs. The media have NEVER been so mistrusted as they are now, and many more people are waking up to that reality on a daily basis. Television figures are down and diminishing fast, as many people turn to the internet (Youtube, iPlayer, Amazon Prime etc) for their viewing pleasure. Social media is a growing trend, despite what the MSM are trying to misinform people to the contrary. I believe that now people realise that their own socialist views (even those who never knew they were socialists) are not in a minority anymore, support for Jeremy Corbyn is growing (and will continue to grow) faster than the MSM can demonise it. The more it grows with newspapers against Jeremy’s policies, the quicker we will see the the death of the printed media. If I was a savvy newspaper media baron, I’d be supporting Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership just so I’d know that my sales would be rising, not falling!

        The population are being told that if there was a general election within the next year, Labour would lose. That would only be the case if the LabourCoup plotters were not deselected from the party and replaced with socialist representatives. I think that, once they are replaced, Labour can and will win a larger majority than Tony Blair did in 1997. Their is huge realisation that the privatisation of the 80’s and 90’s of our family silver (water, gas, electricity, public transport, and parts of the NHS) was a massive mistake which has given huge profits to the private sector, whilst systematically reducing the revenue of the nation’s coffers. I know that some would argue the question “If socialism was so popular then why is there a majority Tory government now?”. Well that’s very easy to answer. The Tories were offering an EU referendum, which meant that those who’ve suffered poverty and job losses in the world’s 5th largest economy, would have the chance to vote to leave a neoliberal elitist organisation. They had nothing left to lose by voting for Brexit and showing disdain for a regime that would not allow a country to nationalise failing industry, suffocated small & medium sized business for the benefit of large corporations, and that were willing sign the TTIP deal and hold the British people ransom to corporate greed and profits. The Tory & UKIP majority vote has now served it purpose and will be very different in the next GE. Why else would Theresa May have given that speech she gave on the day of her coronation? They are now desperately trying to appear socialist all of a sudden, but thankfully the British people will see through it once her honeymoon period is over.

        Like

      • Bitethehand says:

        So if Jeremy Corbyn was shouting against the Blair government then good on him. Because whatever good the Labour Party did Blair is responsible for the death of millions, instability throughout the world, spending of trillions in arms, the refugee crisis, the rise of the far right, the demonisation of a religion , the loss of privacy and human rights, the condoning of the use of torture.

        And George Bush, didn’t he have a small part in all of this?

        There is a list of 100 achievements of the Blair governments but I can only find the top fifty.

        https://keeptonyblairforpm.wordpress.com/labours-blairs-top-50-achievements-since-1997/

        Is there any other party in the democratic world that would so excoriate its most successful leader?

        And now Tom Watson, Labour’s Deputy Leader is being threatened with deselection.

        Like

    • Davey Stewart says:

      WOW! Now that is why is believe you need to be on a podium Bernadette! You have just summarised the the truth of what supporting Jeremy Corbyn is, and should be, all about. It’s is quite remarkable that so many of the ‘Blarite’ New Labour supporters are either sheeple who believe EVERYTHING they are told by the lame stream media, or are those that really should be voting Tory because they somehow benefit from the sort of political points of view that you have so rightfully pointed out as being wrong.

      It is high time the Labour party resorted back to it’s socialist values that appeal to, and benefit, the wider masses of this nation. It is no longer acceptable for the party to operate as ‘Diet Tory’ or even ‘Full Fat Tory’ as was the case with New Labour.

      When Tony Blair was elected in 1997, it was largely due to the fact that he was a great orator, the alternative was John Major, and the Tories has caused so much heartache and destruction of the UK since 1979. The only reason Margaret Thatcher lasted as long as she did was because of the ‘Falklands effect’, which saw her waning approval figures skyrocket after the conflict ended. It created a huge wave of patriotism, which was cemented by the Charles and Diana royal wedding and eventual birth of Prince William. If it hadn’t have been for those events, we would have had Michael Foot’s socialist Labour party running the nation for the good of the masses rather than the few.

      Foolishly, many people believe that we must have some form of New Labour in order to get into number 10, Downing Street. That attitude is starting to change now that we share information and opinions like never before seen in history. Owen Jones seems to believe that social media is a very small part of the requirements needed to win a general election. I disagree! I believe that the power of the MSM is diminishing fast, especially after Leveson, Hillsborough and Chilcot etc, whilst more people are communicating using Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and even becoming the authors of their own blogs. The media have NEVER been so mistrusted as they are now, and many more people are waking up to that reality on a daily basis. Television figures are down and diminishing fast, as many people turn to the internet (Youtube, iPlayer, Amazon Prime etc) for their viewing pleasure. Social media is a growing trend, despite what the MSM are trying to misinform people to the contrary. I believe that now people realise that their own socialist views (even those who never knew they were socialists) are not in a minority anymore, support for Jeremy Corbyn is growing (and will continue to grow) faster than the MSM can demonise it. The more it grows with newspapers against Jeremy’s policies, the quicker we will see the the death of the printed media. If I was a savvy newspaper media baron, I’d be supporting Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership just so I’d know that my sales would be rising, not falling!

      The population are being told that if there was a general election within the next year, Labour would lose. That would only be the case if the LabourCoup plotters were not deselected from the party and replaced with socialist representatives. I think that, once they are replaced, Labour can and will win a larger majority than Tony Blair did in 1997. Their is huge realisation that the privatisation of the 80’s and 90’s of our family silver (water, gas, electricity, public transport, and parts of the NHS) was a massive mistake which has given huge profits to the private sector, whilst systematically reducing the revenue of the nation’s coffers. I know that some would argue the question “If socialism was so popular then why is there a majority Tory government now?”. Well that’s very easy to answer. The Tories were offering an EU referendum, which meant that those who’ve suffered poverty and job losses in the world’s 5th largest economy, would have the chance to vote to leave a neoliberal elitist organisation. They had nothing left to lose by voting for Brexit and showing disdain for a regime that would not allow a country to nationalise failing industry, suffocated small & medium sized business for the benefit of large corporations, and that were willing sign the TTIP deal and hold the British people ransom to corporate greed and profits. The Tory & UKIP majority vote has now served it purpose and will be very different in the next GE. Why else would Theresa May have given that speech she gave on the day of her coronation? They are now desperately trying to appear socialist all of a sudden, but thankfully the British people will see through it once her honeymoon period is over.

      Like

  3. Davey Stewart says:

    First of all I would like to say thank you to Sarah for her heartwarming story, and for taking the time to share it with us all. But most of all I would like to say thank you to Bernadette (notsoloonyleft) for enabling Sarah’s story in the first place. You have a special talent for seeing into the soul of others, and noticing the inspirational enthusiasm from a mere smile. That suggests to me that you are a true socialist. One who sees the good within people and feels the need to share that love with the world. It tells me that you too have great love and respect for your fellow human beings, feeling their joy and spreading that message. You too deserve to be on a platform explaining your own story, what inspires you, why you feel the same as that wonderful smile you identified with, and how you feel your life is changing with Jeremy Corbyn at the helm of our beloved political party. I hope that a Momentum group see your potential and invite you to share your thoughts with the masses.

    Thank you once again Bernadette, for reading that enthused smile and interpreting it into words that inspire and bring tears of joy and hope to us all.

    Kindest regards and love

    Davey Stewart

    @Davey_Stewart

    Like

    • Thank you Davey. I am deeply touched by your words. I am just happy that people have responded in such a positive way and hopefully will help others to share their views and get involved .
      Once again thank you – you words mean a lot to me and I reall appreciate you taking time to write the

      Like

  4. chelleryn says:

    Reblogged this on Turning the Tide and commented:
    Enjoy!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. […] Source: What is the deal with this guy ? […]

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  6. concernedkev says:

    I loved how Jeremy thanked the challenge for leadership for giving him a chance to reach out to many more people in the areas where they feel abandoned by Westminster. The turnout has been amazing and bodes well for a massive change in how local Labour parties will be organised in the future. We have to all get involved where we can.
    We need candidates for Westminster who are not careerist or opportunistic but there to bring irreversible change for the majority who have been outcasts for the last 30 years
    Solidarity and forward to an eventual Labour government

    Like

  7. crumcat says:

    Reblogged this on writing702 and commented:
    Read it. Oh, read it.

    Like

  8. […] Source: What is the deal with this guy ? […]

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  9. […] Source: What is the deal with this guy ? – notsoloonyleft […]

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  10. John says:

    I agree with Kev: we need new people with new ideas and new vitality to engage within the Labour Party,
    I hope you and Sarah consider putting yourselves forward as candidates for election as Labour Party candidates.
    Start off at the local level and then think about putting yourself forward for national office.
    It may all seem daunting but once you are there you will be able to adjust and adapt yourselves.
    We need good understanding people like you in the party!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Rob Atkinson says:

    Reblogged this on Life, Leeds United, the Universe & Everything and commented:
    The Corbyn Effect, Illustrated in One Person’s Facial Expression

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Julia Forsyth says:

    Sarah you brought a lump to my throat, what a brilliant piece of writing, summing up how thousands of us feel xx

    Liked by 3 people

  13. seagullnic says:

    Reblogged this on No Time to Think and commented:
    Love this…

    Liked by 1 person

  14. jeanid123 says:

    Reblogged this on jeanid123.

    Like

  15. Mark Russell says:

    I have been eligible to vote for 36 years, and I’ve known no other administations in that time, save right wing neoclassical economics and ideology. It becomes grinding, demoralising, as you see the slow drip of greed and self take hold of the national consciousness all too often.
    We thought we may have had hope, oh so briefly, when John Smith became leader of Labour in the ’90s, only to tragically die soon into his tenure, and to be replaced with Blair, taking Labour to it’s darkest days in so many ways.
    Fast forward to last year, and the leadership contest – to find a man who understands, has been nothing but consistent his entire political life. A man with such empathy, such compassion. A man I never thought I’d see in my lifetime, to lead us into a fairer and more just way of life.
    I saw him in both York and Leeds – he truly moved so many, and as a man who’s always avoided being specifically party political, I am now a member of the Labour party, finally nailing my colours to the mast, after 36 years of disappointment and anger at how we, the elctorate have been treated by all sides in the neoliberal narrative.
    JC brings us a unique opportunity, not seen since the 1945 government that brought us the NHS and the welfare state. He gives us hope, and we start to empower ourselves, eachother.
    We are more than supporters – we are a movement, and a movement that has been needed for way, way too long now.
    Whatever happens, the lid is off the box, and I feel that this change will continue – long may it do so….

    Liked by 4 people

    • Seeing the pictures from Liverpool last night was amazing. It really does feel like there is hope and things will happen and change

      Liked by 1 person

      • Davey Stewart says:

        I assume you’re talking about JC’s rally and not Owen Smith’s epic fail, with his bused in handful of miserable looking ‘supporters’ eating free ice-cream, which failed to bribe in the masses? Jeremy Corbyn speaks for the people. Owen Smith speaks over them!

        Like

      • I am talking about how people feel when they hear JC and find all these other people who feel the same. With regard to the Smith rally yes it is very sad , but the saddest thing for me is that instead of getting behind the obviously wonderfully inspirational and movitivating feeling there is at the moment in the JC section of the Labour Party we have to see this debacle and failure.
        Unfortunately, more people will react positively to Owen due to the understanding they have of Jeremy and his ideas and policies so we have to counterbalance this by sharing and campaigning for Jeremy everywhere. The crowd , if we can call it that, at Owens rally was small because people who are staying with the same old same old of New Labour won’t do out to hear a speech – but we do and it is that enthusiasm and power and commitment we must harness and use to explain and inform.
        Owen has to speak over them by the way because if he stops he might forget his lines- Jeremy speaks from the heart and people want to listen.

        Like

  16. angel1ne says:

    Inspirational,it’s his fault I’ve gone from being a Labour supporters to being a member,have joined a union, now I’m also a member of Momentum!I’m attending party meetings when I can, I’ve been on marches and demonstrated!! I read political articles, books and blogs i follow strange people on YouTube!! What has happened, im just a normal middle aged Mum!It’s the new Socialist Corbyn effect!! I love it!!

    Liked by 5 people

    • I am exactly the same .! A middle aged mum who has joined the Labour Party , unite , momentum and due to not being able to get out there at the moment has started writing a blog, Facebook page , makes videos and memes, is on Twitter and even tumblr ( I feel old on there ) sharing as much information in as many ways as possible so people can make their own minds up.

      We are a movement for change and what ever way we can get the message out to people we will
      #wearehismedia

      Liked by 2 people

  17. Jenny says:

    Started my day by finding this blog and already not so loony left you summed up my thoughts exactly and then Sarah you made me cry. Not from any pity but from the eloquence that you write with. Brilliant. Though Jeremy in Liverpool was the best yet. Together we can. Thanks for writing

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Sarah says:

    Testing testing. Was my comment too long? Does it need to be moderated?

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Sarah says:

    Hi there! Erm… I’m the woman in the photo! Someone recognised me and sent me your article (very surreal experience). I just thought I’d write a bit to expand on what you’ve said, to give a bit more insight to why I was so lit up.

    Growing up, I used to ask questions about what I saw when my dad watched the news. My dad would say “shush I’m watching the news” and my mum would say “I don’t know, I don’t bother with that stuff anymore.” Any mention of something political and she would shut off with a look of faint disgust. As a kid I didn’t really put two and two together, but it made sense later on. That my mum had difficulties with mental health, that she had been prevented from being able to be employed by that and was placed under the additional crushing weight of poverty, trying to get together enough food to keep me and my brother well. That she had no access to any support and at the same time was labelled one of those council estate scroungers… what would that do to your faith in politics? What was the point? They would come along with their promises, rarely aimed at you in any case as you’re below the level they’re pitching at, and would break any designed to shatter poverty/inequality and improve mental health anyway. That’s the thing, even Labour had stopped aiming at families like ours. The rhetoric across all parties became increasingly aimed at those lucky enough to dream of buying a house, not those who struggled to buy bread.

    Jump forward to me being a teenager, brought up to treat others nicely, as you never, ever know how bad a day someone is having, so you should try to behave like they might be sad. Because there’s no way of knowing. To have a deep knowledge of how bad things can happen that nobody expects or would will on their worst enemies and that those things can make life hard enough that basic functioning can be a major struggle. Knowing my mum was bitter about politics but that she was proud of having a daughter who cared about stuff, even if she wasn’t sure it would ever end up helping anything. I ended up with my own mental health difficulties, also Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Was knocked flat out of education. Got a middle class boyfriend. Had to explain to him that he couldn’t just say I could help myself to anything in the fridge, that the idea terrified me (anyone who has been in a similar situation might understand that). Hearing his parents talking about politics and feeling hurt for not growing up in a house where politics was something to be discussed, not given up on, and feeling so very, painfully stupid. Relearned that I was different and didn’t truly have a space at the table.

    Early twenties, and I’ve have been cajoled into trying university, discover I like it. Study sociology, as it seems to look closest at the things I find fascinating but don’t understand. Hierarchies. Intersections of oppression. Why I have always felt in some vital, essential way different and lower than my middle class counterparts, to those without illness. I learn about inequalities. I learn about micro-aggressions. I learn about it not being all my fault no matter how much my subconscious screams that I’m stupid in spite of my grades. Not that it made much difference, I felt no connection with Labour as much as I wanted to, as it wasn’t fighting for those who desperately needed fighting for, and I felt there was nowhere realistically to turn.

    I manage to get a scholarship for a post-grad I could never have afforded otherwise, eventually decide academia is not for me for various reasons, then what happens? The world starts to feel like it’s turning on its head as it looks like someone that’s actually loudly talking about poverty, about mental health, about the benefits of immigration might get into a position of power. Can you imagine? I watch a video and here’s someone talking about how they always, even in times of great stress make sure they *make* time to do nice and relaxing things – promoting self-care for mental health. I see someone suggesting that they aren’t sure about a plan for single gender train carriages and that they need to look at more evidence and *speak to women* to find out if it would really be appreciated. I see someone saying they refuse to be involved in slanging matches, that vociferously campaigned against apartheid, that supported numerous campaigns in spite of them not necessarily being the best for his career. Helping those at the very very bottom is never good for your career. They don’t seem to have the power to immediately make it worth your while. They’re often disenfranchised and bitter about politics and don’t see the point in bothering.

    I called my mum to ask her if she’d think about joining as an affiliate (if I sent her a bit of money to cover it) to vote for Corbyn as I felt he could actually do something. She laughed angrily and said “I don’t think so.” She had only recently written to Cameron to explain that the bedroom tax meant she couldn’t afford a winter coat. That there wasn’t a smaller council house for her to move to with her son. He explained in his cookie cutter letter that we all have to make sacrifices and tighten our belts. Can you imagine? Can you? Still, she realised how important it was to me and asked me to explain what I thought was so different.

    My mum watches the news now. She watched newsnight even. She calls me to ask me to explain political stuff. She is engaged. She calls Corbyn “our Jeremy, bless ‘im.” But it’s not about just one person, it’s about someone trying to turn the oil tanker that is the Labour Party, trying to get it back on the course we need it to be, when we don’t have any access to the steering wheel. I feel like there might be space for me in the Labour Party now, and my mum. There might be more people who care as deeply and will let us in, not just tell us we’re naive, not tell us we’re stupid, not tell us we’re fanatics, not crow over bits of news reveling in difficulties the campaign has, not rubbing salt in that open wound. There might be a way to feel empowered. To allow my mum to feel empowered. I won’t have been the only one with a story like that either – I can’t tell you how it feels, but “unrestrained joy” comes pretty close.

    That’s what was running through my head as I stood there smiling.

    Liked by 21 people

    • Hello Sarah ! Thank you so so much for writing and telling your story. It is so wonderful to have a person to attach to this beautiful picture. Seeing your face said all the above to me, that finally there is a person who you can listen to agree with and can make a difference.
      I am currently suffering from agoraphobia ( after depression and anxiety meant I had to stop working earlier this year) so I understand about mental illness. This of course means I cannot get to rally’s etc at the moment hence my starting this blog, Facebook page and every other form of social media to get his message out there.
      I am not university educated, I am working class living on a council estate in London with my partner and four children. However I did not go to uni as it was not done. I felt so much pride when dropping my daughter at uni but I confess I actually had a physical pain as well as I so longed to be going as well. Maybe one day!
      I hope you approve of what I have written. It is just my observations and feelings but I have to say your smile inspired me to start this blog. As I thought that much happiness has to be shared.
      My story echoes yours in many ways . I was always the loony lefty in my home and my family did not engage as much with politics. But my father gave me my questioning mind and the desire to do good in this world so I am doing this in his memory , as you do this for your mothers voice.

      Thank you so much for again for getting in touch. And thank you again for your beautiful smile

      Liked by 8 people

      • Liz Philipson says:

        Dont give up on uni. I did not have mental health problems particularly but had all sorts of difficulties that meant I did not go to University. I eventually funded myself when I was in my last thirties to do open university and then an MA at South bank. Its tough doing that and a full time job but I got so much out of it. Not least the confidence to know that I could get the grades and was up to it!

        Like

      • Thank you Liz for that encouragement. I think everything happening in my life at the moment in regards my health etc is here for a reason and I know I would have the support and love of my family to do it – seriously thinking of it as a future plan .

        You went to South Bank! I worked there for a while in the library and live a bus ride away from it – maybe I will be walking it’s halls for a different reason one day
        Many many thanks for your comment
        Love and peace
        Bernadette

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      • Sarah says:

        Thanks very much for your kind comment 🙂 I’m pretty bowled over by the response from folk on here. I’ve made a public post so if people want to link to that, they can. https://www.facebook.com/sarah.harper.96199/posts/10157216138650405

        I agree that you should consider trying university if you possibly can at some point, and that South Bank has some wonderful people working there. You could always try asking their sociology or whatever department have any public talks you could go to to get a feel for it. You write very well, I think you’d do great!

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      • Thank you – i am just really happy that people are able to read what you have said as I think that the link between my interpretation and your actual comments has really hit home for a lot of people. And the aim of all of this is to reach people so they can understand why we are supporting Jeremy for leader and what changes we want to see happen in the Labour Party .

        Like

    • Mandy wildman says:

      Thank you:)

      Liked by 1 person

    • James Walker says:

      Tears running down my face reading this. Thank you for taking the time to share.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Sarah, that’s the best explanation I have read on why people support Jeremy Corbyn. Your reply to the blog post deserves to go viral! And your picture is wonderful – it says it all, even without the explanation. But *with* the explanation – wow!

      Liked by 2 people

    • I am so touched by this you have brought a tear to my eye, but I am smiling too. Well done Sarah, let there be more like you.

      Liked by 1 person

    • concernedkev says:

      Excellent article Sarah you’ve made an old Socialist proud to know there are great Comrades like you back in the party. I lived through Kinnock’s destruction of the Party in the 80s and told him to his face in 85. The witch hunts that went on forced many out and paved the way for Blair and his cronyism and the abandonment of massive swathes of working class communities. They turned to others who had a more sinister motive to divide and rule. Hopefully thanks to good people like you we can win them back on a positive socialist program as put forward by Jeremy and John McDonnell. In the meantime the attitude of present MPs some who were selected to support the Blair narrative by small groups who have controlled Constituency Labour Parties needs to change and they need to get behind the members choice of leader.or go their own way which is what I believe has been their intention since last September.
      You should consider standing for MP we need people with your experience to give a voice to the many who feel abandoned
      God bless
      Kevin

      Liked by 1 person

      • Sarah says:

        Aw yay. No chance of me being an MP but I’m going to try to be slightly more involved from the side-lines. Thank you, I really appreciate what you’ve written!

        Like

    • Tony says:

      Empowered…brilliant word. I hope that Corbyn underlines the reality (and he seems to at every opportunity) that it’s not just about him and what he can do for us, it’s about us and what a Corbyn-led Labour party can empower us to do for ourselves. WE are the people we’ve been waiting for 😀

      Liked by 2 people

    • Brilliantly expressed.

      Like

    • jeopardia says:

      This made me well up. I wish all those people who are so dismissive of Jeremy and so patronising and rude about us all could read this and other stories like it. I think it would be great to have a place like a webpage or blog or something for stories like this, for people to share anonymously or otherwise, why they are part of this movement and the journey that brought them here, because it is really powerful stuff.

      Like

      • Maybe Sarah would consider submitting her comment to the Labour Party or Momentum national websites, to be used as a kind of ‘unsolicited testimonial’?

        Like

      • Sarah says:

        Someone I know who does organising for Momentum York was the one that sent me this blog post in the first place and he asked me if they could share it – then they asked if I could speak briefly at an event. So it’s kinda going to be out there. I agree that a site where people can anonymously express stuff like that would be lovely 🙂

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    • Dorothy Osborne says:

      Oh you wonderful wonderful person thank you so much for telling about your experiences through life that touched my heart. Very best wishes to you and your Mum

      Like

    • Didi Cooper says:

      sarah are you on facebook? i shared your comments and am getting loads of love for them, I’d like to be able to attribute that to its rightful owner msg me didi cooper on facebook through ‘jeremy corbyn will be prime minister’

      Like

      • I do hope Sarah will be I touch with you – it was a big surprise to hear come her !

        As well as giving correct credit to Sarah for her amazing account could I ask you also link to the blog page itself. Basically started this as a way to communicate more about how we feel, that we are basically everyday people who want a new type of politics and to actually get information out there.

        I am currently working on a web site as well as posting on Twitter etc. I also run the Facebook page unite and fight the £25 charge

        The more we share the more likely this information will not only be circulated by the converted but also it will be read by those who are curious about all the Jeremy hype and hopefully those labour voters we need to convince.

        This is why I am doing this – and I am so so happy that Sarah responded and wrote such a wonderful article – please share this organic promotion and let’s get out there for Jeremy

        Many thanks
        Bernadette
        Not so loony left

        Like

      • Sarah says:

        Hello Didi, my apologies for not responding sooner, I’ve been away and largely away from internet contact. I have written a public blog post out for you so you can link that if you would like. 🙂 https://www.facebook.com/sarah.harper.96199/posts/10157216138650405

        Like

    • Mahri Abercrombie says:

      Thank you for finding the words I couldn’t.

      Like

  20. Elaine Newell says:

    He is the voice of many ordinary people, he understands the struggles people face and empowers people and brings communities together, something that was lost in the Thatcher years. People have a chance to change politics with Corbyn at the helm. Power to the people. #KeepCorbyn

    Liked by 6 people

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