Hear my voice

So we have today a lovely piece in the guardian today from Tom Watson.


Let’s just take a few moments here to digest the headline.  The article here.

Tom Watson guardian article
I thoughts about how to respond and I though how unfair it is that he gets to express himself in this national newspaper which I think to be honest is also having an existential crisis if that is possible for a newspaper.

And I thought about the response to and the events happened because of a recent blog I posted.

What’s the deal with this guy
My words inspired someone to write a comment which inspired many.  This then lead to the responder amongst other things giving a speech and my being asked to write for a website.

What would happen if that voice had larger audience?

Also today I read another post by someone like me.  Trying to calmly explain that we are not idiot or fools, we are not the ones hell bent of the distraction of a political movement that we love nor are we all coerced into blindly following one man like a brainwashed cult.

So I shared it on here as it made me think two voices are better than one.

But we have 500,000 voices.  Not all of them will sing with us but the majority would.

So here I will post Sarah’s response again to my blog and I am asking you to do something .  It is one small thing but we can make it massive.

Take a few seconds to like and then reply.  It can be a long or short reply .  I want to hear how you feel , why you support Jeremy, why you became interested in politics even why you joined.  No insults or derision , no personal attacks or hate.  Just why you want Jeremy as leader.

Let’s have a central collection of voices . Share blog posts and links so that all of this information can be put together so all our single voices become one and this can then be shared even more to show people who we truly are.

We have been demeaned and vilified for too long – we need to respond with a united voice.

Please share and post and reblog and Twitter and print and do whatever it takes for this to get off the ground and start running .

Thank you #wearehismedia

Sarah says:

July 31, 2016 at 4:09 pm

Hi there! Erm… I’m the woman in the photo! Someone recognised me and sent me your article (very surreal experience). I just thought I’d write a bit to expand on what you’ve said, to give a bit more insight to why I was so lit up.
Growing up, I used to ask questions about what I saw when my dad watched the news. My dad would say “shush I’m watching the news” and my mum would say “I don’t know, I don’t bother with that stuff anymore.” Any mention of something political and she would shut off with a look of faint disgust. As a kid I didn’t really put two and two together, but it made sense later on. That my mum had difficulties with mental health, that she had been prevented from being able to be employed by that and was placed under the additional crushing weight of poverty, trying to get together enough food to keep me and my brother well. That she had no access to any support and at the same time was labelled one of those council estate scroungers… what would that do to your faith in politics? What was the point? They would come along with their promises, rarely aimed at you in any case as you’re below the level they’re pitching at, and would break any designed to shatter poverty/inequality and improve mental health anyway. That’s the thing, even Labour had stopped aiming at families like ours. The rhetoric across all parties became increasingly aimed at those lucky enough to dream of buying a house, not those who struggled to buy bread.
Jump forward to me being a teenager, brought up to treat others nicely, as you never, ever know how bad a day someone is having, so you should try to behave like they might be sad. Because there’s no way of knowing. To have a deep knowledge of how bad things can happen that nobody expects or would will on their worst enemies and that those things can make life hard enough that basic functioning can be a major struggle. Knowing my mum was bitter about politics but that she was proud of having a daughter who cared about stuff, even if she wasn’t sure it would ever end up helping anything. I ended up with my own mental health difficulties, also Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Was knocked flat out of education. Got a middle class boyfriend. Had to explain to him that he couldn’t just say I could help myself to anything in the fridge, that the idea terrified me (anyone who has been in a similar situation might understand that). Hearing his parents talking about politics and feeling hurt for not growing up in a house where politics was something to be discussed, not given up on, and feeling so very, painfully stupid. Relearned that I was different and didn’t truly have a space at the table.
Early twenties, and I’ve have been cajoled into trying university, discover I like it. Study sociology, as it seems to look closest at the things I find fascinating but don’t understand. Hierarchies. Intersections of oppression. Why I have always felt in some vital, essential way different and lower than my middle class counterparts, to those without illness. I learn about inequalities. I learn about micro-aggressions. I learn about it not being all my fault no matter how much my subconscious screams that I’m stupid in spite of my grades. Not that it made much difference, I felt no connection with Labour as much as I wanted to, as it wasn’t fighting for those who desperately needed fighting for, and I felt there was nowhere realistically to turn.
I manage to get a scholarship for a post-grad I could never have afforded otherwise, eventually decide academia is not for me for various reasons, then what happens? The world starts to feel like it’s turning on its head as it looks like someone that’s actually loudly talking about poverty, about mental health, about the benefits of immigration might get into a position of power. Can you imagine? I watch a video and here’s someone talking about how they always, even in times of great stress make sure they *make* time to do nice and relaxing things – promoting self-care for mental health. I see someone suggesting that they aren’t sure about a plan for single gender train carriages and that they need to look at more evidence and *speak to women* to find out if it would really be appreciated. I see someone saying they refuse to be involved in slanging matches, that vociferously campaigned against apartheid, that supported numerous campaigns in spite of them not necessarily being the best for his career. Helping those at the very very bottom is never good for your career. They don’t seem to have the power to immediately make it worth your while. They’re often disenfranchised and bitter about politics and don’t see the point in bothering.
I called my mum to ask her if she’d think about joining as an affiliate (if I sent her a bit of money to cover it) to vote for Corbyn as I felt he could actually do something. She laughed angrily and said “I don’t think so.” She had only recently written to Cameron to explain that the bedroom tax meant she couldn’t afford a winter coat. That there wasn’t a smaller council house for her to move to with her son. He explained in his cookie cutter letter that we all have to make sacrifices and tighten our belts. Can you imagine? Can you? Still, she realised how important it was to me and asked me to explain what I thought was so different.
My mum watches the news now. She watched newsnight even. She calls me to ask me to explain political stuff. She is engaged. She calls Corbyn “our Jeremy, bless ‘im.” But it’s not about just one person, it’s about someone trying to turn the oil tanker that is the Labour Party, trying to get it back on the course we need it to be, when we don’t have any access to the steering wheel. I feel like there might be space for me in the Labour Party now, and my mum. There might be more people who care as deeply and will let us in, not just tell us we’re naive, not tell us we’re stupid, not tell us we’re fanatics, not crow over bits of news reveling in difficulties the campaign has, not rubbing salt in that open wound. There might be a way to feel empowered. To allow my mum to feel empowered. I won’t have been the only one with a story like that either – I can’t tell you how it feels, but “unrestrained joy” comes pretty close.
That’s what was running through my head as I stood there smiling.
Liked by 21 people

Tired of the same old politics – by Tony Leigh 

The Labour leadership race is all over the news at the moment. My reason for writing this article is just to explain, calmly and rationally, a few of the reasons why I think Jeremy Corbyn is the best bet not only to lead Labour, but the whole of the UK.

Before you roll your eyes and say “another loony lefty, brainwashed by Corbyn”, let me explain to you a little about my background.

I am a 32 year old, self-employed electrician. I love football (I’m a Gooner for what its worth), music and going down the pub. I’m also a father of two beautiful little girls. My parents split when I was 3 years old and I have never been what you would call well off. I rent my home and at this moment in time cannot ever see myself being in a position to buy a home of my own. I have had to work hard for every penny.

I’m not saying not everyone does, but just trying to put into perspective the view many have of your typical “Corbynite”. It seems to me its only the great unwashed or the middle class bourgeoise that people think are backing Jeremy.

This patently isn’t true.

At a recent local meeting, I found people from many different working backgrounds, races, religions and nationalities. We all had one thing in common. A goal. To make the country we live in better for everyone. A desire to make politics fairer, to bring that to the entire nation, not just those that can afford Savile Row suits and second homes.

I hear people complaining all the time about politicians being out of touch, being self-serving, claiming unwarranted expenses. I could go on. The list is endless.

Well at this moment, for the first time in a long while, certainly in my lifetime, we have an opportunity to finally get behind someone who will fight for everyone. Who will fight to see everyone get a say in how we run the country. Not just pay lip service and spew out promises they have no intention of keeping.

“Jeremy Corbyn’s weak and unelectable” is a favourite of the media, but how can a man, who from the very day of being elected leader, has fought against not only his “enemies” (the media and the Tories), but also against his supposed colleagues and peers, be called weak? Its nonsense. Under his leadership, in just nine months, he has already changed the face of politics.

This change has become fashionable with the likes of Theresa May promoting values pioneered by Corbyn in her first ever speech as Prime Minister. Now, we even have Owen Smith taking to the platform in the leadership race with policies that Corbyn has been championing, policies that were deemed “too left and unpopular”. Policies, debates and a surge in membership that have been unprecedented and reawakened and invigorated those like me who were alienated from politics by “business as usual”.

In all honesty, I’d never heard of Jeremy Corbyn until he was elected leader. I too thought, this bloke can’t be Prime Minister. He’s scruffy, he’s too polite etc. I’d long known the media had an agenda and told us what they wanted us to know not what we needed to know, but I still bought into the lies. I paid a passing interest in politics because I’d been told if you don’t vote, you can’t complain about the state of the country. One day that changed.

Rather than looking at Jeremy, I listened. I listened to a man, that actually wasn’t that scruffy, and heard him speak about a society that benefits the many, not the few. I heard a man saying the things I’d said for years, but never heard repeated by a politician. I heard a man speak that sounded like you and me.

Every time I hear Jeremy Corbyn speak, I feel the honesty in his words. Here is a man, I thought, that doesn’t say what he thinks everyone wants to hear. This bloke says what he means, what he actually wants to see happen, and none of it is about him.

People say that Corbyn’s politics and economics are vague, but many of those who criticise him don’t actually take the time to listen. I won’t bandy about facts and figures, but I know that proposing a higher living wage than both the Tories and Owen Smith, with fact based reasons can only be a good thing for everyone.

He has a policy to create 1,000,000 jobs in his first term in office. Real concrete jobs- manufacturing, trade etc. Things a working person can be proud of. He wants to introduce a fair living wage for all, which will enable us to spend and build the economy, rather than those at the top stripping profit and taking money away from our economy for themselves. This is a man that wants to build homes for people. Affordable, decent homes. Hopefully when my children grow up they can afford their own homes. With the current state of the country I’m not confident that’ll be the case.

Immigration is a huge issue for Britain, but I don’t believe that the problems we face are down to immigrants, as many would have you believe. There are masses of evidence out there, that for the past 40 years budgets and cutbacks to our essential services, schools, hospital beds, social housing, jobs, and so on, have been held back by a right wing Labour or cut by the Tories.

If we invested more in these areas, immigration wouldn’t be an issue. Migrants aren’t stealing your jobs, doctors appointments, houses. They’ve been stolen by people that want to gain more for themselves and their mates, without a care in the world for us.

Brexit has seen a peak in these thoughts, and that was all accountable to the Tories. Jeremy Corbyn has got a lot of stick over the Brexit result, but remember he made more appearances than any other Labour MP during the campaign. I still maintain, investment removes these hurdles and immigration would be much less of a flashpoint.
In closing, Jeremy is my choice to lead Britain to better things, because he is an honest man who wants everyone to succeed. Not just those with the money to succeed.
View story at Medium.com

What is the deal with this guy ?

Just take a look at that picture. I challenge you to look at that picture and not smile.

The expression on that woman’s face is wonderful.  There is an unrestrained joy in that face.  That face is real and genuine and if just happy.

Happy because she is listening to words that resonate with her and ideas which she can support.  Happy because she feels that finally someone is speaking to her personally and saying I see the same things you do.  I get angry about the same things you do. I can do something about it.

There is so much more tied up in Jeremy Corbyn than politics.  The people who are passionate about him are so because he is a focal point which has inspired action and will inspire more.  The bias  media coverage of this man has been seen and recorded in three separate reports, highlighting that the news itself has an agenda and it is not one which is in favour of socialism.

What also makes people smile like this when they see or hear Jeremy Corbyn is that you actually know that what he says he means and he will work his hardest to get it.  He has principle and morals and he stands by these and that is something unique not normally seen in politics.  And that is why the woman is smiling .

She knows that finally to one politician at least she is not collateral , as Theresa May or Owen Smith may see the public  as both of them are so keen to push the button on trident.  She is not a person to be dismissed because of her sex. She is not just a vote to push someone into power.  She knows she to this man she is a living human being not a number,  and that is how he sees everyone around the world.

When was the last time you saw anyone create such a look on another persons face?

That is why we are fighting to keep him as leader of the Labour Party.